Whatever Happened To Sin?

A Christian counselor wrote, quote
“It’s the only human choice ahead
If you can’t support it
Why don’t you abort it instead?”
You say you pray to the sky
Why? when you’re afraid to take a stand down here
‘Cause while the holy talk reads like a bad ad-lib
Silence screams you were robbing the crib
Say it ain’t none of my business, huh?
A woman’s got a right to choose
Now a grave-digger
Next you pull the trigger
What then?
Whatever happened to sin?

I heard the Reverend say
“Gay is probably normal in the Good Lord’s sight
What’s to be debated?
Jesus never stated what’s right”
I’m no theology nut, but
The Reverend may be a little confused
For if the Lord don’t care
And he chooses to ignore-ah
Tell it to the people
Of Sodom and Gomorrah (woah)

Call it just an alternate lifestyle, huh?
Morality lies within
Conscience is arrestin
Please repeat the question again
Whatever happened to sin?

When the closets are empty
And the clinics are full
When your eyes have been blinded
By society’s wool
When the streets erupt
In your own backyard
You’ll be on your knees
Praying for the national guard
If you don’t care now
How the problems get solved
You can shake your head later
That you never got involved
‘Cause the call came ringing
From the throne of gold
But you never got the message
‘Cause your mind’s on hold

A politician next door
Swore he’d set the Washington Arena on fire
Thinks he’ll gladiate them
But they’re gonna make him a liar
Well he’s a good ole boy
Who was born and raised
In the buckle o’ the Bible Belt
But remember when you step
Into your voting booth
He’ll never lie
He’ll just embellish the truth

Promises were made to be broken, right?
You’ve gotta play the game to win
When you need supporting
Tell ’em that you’re born again
Whatever happened to sin?

© 1983 Sparrow Records

 

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We’re All Worth Saving

Jesus made time for people. All kinds of people. He came to serve, not to be served, and He made no distinction between people of high or low class, between the religious and the sinner, between the socially acceptable and the shunned; He served all alike.

Although Jesus reserved some of his harshest criticism for the hypocrisy of the Pharisees, He did not hate them. He made time for Nicodemus, the fearful Pharisee who came to Him under cover of night to find answers to his troubling questions. He made time to answer the questions of the Pharisees who travelled with Him and His disciples. And when a Pharisee named Simon invited Him to dinner at his house, Jesus accepted his invitation as readily as Matthew’s.

While at Simon’s home, a woman with a local reputation for being sinful came in weeping and proceeded to wash His feet with her tears, dry them with her hair, and annoint them with expensive perfume. This situation Jesus readily accepted also.

Simon however, was appalled. It’s a pretty safe bet that this woman had never been in Simon’s home before, and maybe never would have if Jesus hadn’t been there. To have associations with this notorious sinner would have meant scandal for Simon. He might have been seen as one of those who “…lead captive silly women, laden with sins” (2 Timothy 3:6). Her steps go down to death and Sheol; he wanted nothing to do with her.

It’s my guess that prior to this, she didn’t have much use for the Pharisees, either. I doubt she had any particular longing to be in Simon’s house. But in the presence of Jesus, sinners and Pharisees often find themselves under the same roof.

Jesus lived and moved in two mutually exclusive worlds. Neither one had much tolerance for the other. It was all the same to Him whether He ate with tax collectors and harlots one night, or Pharisees and harlots the next. They were all people whom His Father loved. Beyond that, they were people He loved. Neither the sinner’s disdain nor the Pharisees’s smug self-righteousness was a part of His thinking.

Where Jesus is, anything can happen. Worlds collide, and human beings are reminded that they’re just human beings – nothing more and nothing less. Sinners and Pharisees find themselves under the same roof, faced with the same Saviour, and the realization that we’re ALL worth saving.

 

 

©2017 David Fuller

 

Just Sayin

​I don’t want to read about praying. I want to talk to God.

I don’t want to read about seeking Him. I want to know Him.

I don’t want to read about how to know God’s will. I want to know God’s will because I know God.

I don’t want to take your word for it. I would like to ask God myself. The Bible says I can. And it contains a crowd of witnesses who say He will answer.

I don’t want you to take my word for it. See for yourself. You don’t have to go anywhere or do anything. God is wherever you are, and He has all the time in the world.

I don’t want to read about what it means to know Jesus. I want to learn what it means to know Jesus.

I don’t want to ask, “What do I think Jesus would do?”. I want to ask Jesus what to do.

Incidentally, His answer frequently differs from mine.

I don’t want a religion with you. I want a relationship with Him.

And, hopefully, with you as well.

I don’t want to wonder if He’s real, any more than I wonder if you are.

I don’t want to be left in the dark. I want to see clearly.

I don’t want to be loyal because I fear punishment. I want to be loyal because I love.

I don’t want to worship. I want to adore.

I want The Rapture to happen to my heart right now.

I want to love so much, to love any more would tear me apart at the seams, but that wouldn’t stop me.

I don’t want to be filled with the Spirit. I want God to flow through me like a fountain, and get everyone else wet. Sometimes people get upset when that happens.

Love Re-Interpreted

I Corinthians 13:4-7, the famous Love passage, as seen through the lens of 1 John 4:8, “Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love.”

God is patient, God is kind. He does not envy, He does not brag, He is not proud. He is not rude, He is not self-seeking, He is not easily angered, He keeps no record of wrongs. God does not delight in injustice, but celebrates the truth. He always protects, always believes in you, always hopes, and He never gives up on you. God never fails.

 

 

Hebrews 13:5

God Himself has said, “I will never leave you, I will never abandon you.”

In other words,

He has said, “I will never [under any circumstances] desert you [nor give you up nor leave you without support, nor will I in any degree leave you helpless], nor will I forsake or let you down or relax My hold on you [assuredly not]!”

Amplified Bible (AMP)

Copyright © 2015 by The Lockman Foundation, La Habra, CA 90631. All rights reserved.

 

Psalm 119:130

The fruits of another brother’s research….hope you don’t mind, bro!

Pilgrim's Light for the Path

light

“The opening of your words gives light, it imparts understanding to the simple.” -Psalm 119:130

פֵּתַח דְּבָרֶיךָ יָאִיר מֵבִין פְּתָיִֽים׃

This is the verse I chose to be the verse of this ministry when I first started Pilgrim’s Light Ministries. I chose it because in English it conveys the meaning of anyone can understand the Bible.  While this is true the verse has much more to say than that. What follows is a word-by-word breakdown of the verse:

פֵּתַח

Pay-tach, Pey-Tav-Chet.

The wordpeytach (פֵּתַח) means: to open. That is to open in the sense of opening a door. As such the word is also translated as entrance. Some have used unfolding as a translation and it is a good term and rather poetic, however opening seems to be the most accurate choice. In this sense it would be like unfolding a card by opening it to read the inside.

View original post 1,169 more words

More Than Personal

A good many people nowadays say, “I believe in a God, but not in a personal God.” They feel that the mysterious something which is behind all other things must be more than a person. Now the Christians quite agree. But the Christians are the only people who offer any idea of what a being that is beyond personality could be like. All the other people, though they say that God is beyond personality, really think of Him as something impersonal: that is, as something less than personal. If you are looking for something super-personal, something more than a person, then it is not a question of choosing between the Christian idea and the other ideas. The Christian idea is the only one on the market.

Again, some people think that after this life, or perhaps after several lives, human souls will be “absorbed” into God. But when they try to explain what they mean, they seem to be thinking of our being absorbed into God as one material thing is absorbed into another. They say it is like a drop of water slipping into the sea. But of course that is the end of the drop. If that is what happens to us, then being absorbed is the same as ceasing to exist. It is only the Christians who have any idea of how human souls can be taken into the life of God and yet remain themselves—in fact, be very much more themselves than they were before.

You may ask, “If we cannot imagine a three-personal Being, what is the good of talking about Him?” Well, there isn’t any good talking about Him. The thing that matters is being actually drawn into that three-personal life, and that may begin any time —tonight, if you like.
What I mean is this. An ordinary simple Christian kneels down to say his prayers. He is trying to get into touch with God. But if he is a Christian he knows that what is prompting him to pray is also God: God, so to speak, inside him. But he also knows that all his real knowledge of God comes through Christ, the Man who was God—that Christ is standing beside him, helping him to pray, praying for him. You see what is happening.

God is the thing to which he is praying—the goal he is trying to reach. God is also the thing inside him which is pushing him on—the motive power. God is also the road or bridge along which he is being pushed to that goal. So that the whole threefold life of the three-personal Being is actually going on in that ordinary little bedroom where an ordinary man is saying his prayers. The man is being caught up into the higher kind of life—what I called Zoe or spiritual life: he is being pulled into God, by God, while still remaining himself.

–C.S. Lewis Mere Christianity

 

On The Origin of Humanity

The foundation of all religion being laid in our relation to God as our Creator, it was fit that the book of divine revelations which was intended to be the guide, support, and rule, of religion in the world, should begin, as it does, with a plain and full account of the creation of the world—in answer to that first enquiry of a good conscience, “Where is God my Maker?” (Job 35:10). Concerning this the pagan philosophers wretchedly blundered, and became vain in their imaginations, some asserting the world’s eternity and self-existence, others ascribing it to a fortuitous concourse of atoms: thus “the world by wisdom knew not God,” but took a great deal of pains to lose him. The holy scripture therefore, designing by revealed religion to maintain and improve natural religion, to repair the decays of it and supply the defects of it, since the fall, for the reviving of the precepts of the law of nature, lays down, at first, this principle of the unclouded light of nature, That this world was, in the beginning of time, created by a Being of infinite wisdom and power, who was himself before all time and all worlds. The entrance into God’s word gives this light, Ps. 119:130. The Gen. 1:1 of the Bible gives us a surer and better, a more satisfying and useful, knowledge of the origin of the universe, than all the volumes of the philosophers. The lively faith of humble Christians understands this matter better than the elevated fancy of the greatest wits, Heb. 11:3.
Matthew Henry’s Commentary

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Gen.1.1-Gen.1.31